Genealogy Data Page 158 (Notes Pages)


Tucker, ---------- (b. )

Given Name: ----------
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Newton, John (b. , d. BEF 28 JUL 1697)
Given Name: John
Death: BEF 28 JUL 1697
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----------, Rose (b. ABT 1629, d. BEF 28 JAN 1712)
Given Name: Rose
Death: BEF 28 JAN 1712
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Debnam, William (b. , d. 1657)
Note: William Debnam appears in the Virginia records for the first time in a land patent recorded May 6 1636, when he was claimed as a headright. In 1648 he was one of four men named to appraise the estate of Abraham Turner, a neighbor on the Ware River in Mockjack Bay, Charles River (later Gloucester) County. he later patented two more parcels there, one of 600 acres and another of 1500 acres
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: TVG
Title: The Virginia Genealogist
Data:
Text: "Katherine (___) (Debnam) Grymes and Some relatives," Vol. 41, No. 3 (July-Sept. 1997), pp. 163-171, and "Margaret (Dedman) Perrott and Some Relatives," by Rudolf Loeser, Vol. 42 No. 1, pp. 3-17.
Given Name: William
Death: 1657
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----------, Katherine (b. )
Given Name: Katherine
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Waters, Susannah (b. , d. 1734)
Given Name: Susannah
Death: 1734
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Terrell, Richmond (b. 17 OCT 1624, d. 1680)
Note: Richmond Terrell was the first of his family to settle permanently in America, arriving in 1656. He was described as an "immigrant and purchaser of land." On Nov 28 1656, he was granted a patent on 640 acres in New Kent County in compensation for having transported thirteen people, including his brother Robert. The land was on the south side of the York River.

In 1658 he returned to England on business and then returned once more to Virginia. On Feb 8 1670 he was granted another 640 acres, this time as advance compensation for transporting twelve people, including his brother William.

Both William and Robert were substantial London merchants with extensive trading interests with Virginia. Although both made more than one voyage to the colony, neither settled permanently in America or left descendants here.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: RDLewis
Title: RDLewis
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Doyle
Title: James W. Doyle, Jr., "The Terrells of Reading, London and Virginia," in T
idewater Virginia Families, Vol. 6. No. 3, Nov/Dec 1997
idewater Virginia Families, Vol. 6. No. 3, Nov/Dec 1997
idewater Virginia Families, Vol. 6. No. 3, Nov/Dec 1997.
Given Name: Richmond
Death: 1680 New Kent County, Virginia
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----------, Elizabeth (b. ABT 1631)
Given Name: Elizabeth
Event: Type: Living
Date: 1683
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Jansen, Michiel (b. )
Given Name: Michiel
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Stevens, Maria (b. )
Given Name: Maria
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Van Jever, Jan (b. , d. 1695)
Given Name: Jan
Death: 1695
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Mounier, Pierre (b. )
Given Name: Pierre
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Cutt, Robert (b. , d. ABT 1675)
Note: Little is known of Robert Cutt. Mary Hoel was his second wife.

His widow afterwards married Captain Francis Champerdowne, a native of Devonshire and related to Sir Walter Ralegh. He died in 1687, leaving no children, and his extensive property was divided among the Screven and Cutt families.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: NEHGR
Title: New England Historical and Genealogical Register
Page: Oct. 1889, pp. 356-357
Given Name: Robert
Death: ABT 1675 Kittery, Maine
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Hoel, Mary (b. )
Given Name: Mary
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Beadon, George (b. ABT 1645, d. 1705)
Note: George Beadon (as he spelled it) arrived in South Carolina as one of the Sayle Colony in 1670. He was probably the son of Richard Beadon, of Pinkworthy, Devonshire, England, and his wife Alice Spurway, but this has not been established for sure.

He was among the earliest settlers of Oyster Point, where he was granted town lots 20 and 40 in 1672. He was a member of the first colonial assembly in 1670/1.

Little more is known of George Beadon, except that he left considerable property in his will, including land and slaves.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Pendarvis
Title: Jems Barnwell Heyward, The Genealogy of the Pendarvis-Bedon Families (F
oote & Davies Company
Atlanta, Georgia, 1905)
oote & Davies Company
Atlanta, Georgia, 1905.
Given Name: George
Death: 1705
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----------, Elizabeth (b. )
Given Name: Elizabeth
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Twitty, William (b. , d. 25 MAR 1775)
Note: Captain William Twitty was one of the first settlers in Rutherford County, North Carolina, where he established himself at Twitty's Ford on the Broad River.

In 1775 a group of 28 men assembled by Daniel Boone in Rutherford County set off to cut a trace to the newly acquired lands in Kentucky. According to Felix Walker, a member of the expedition and who later served in Congress, "We placed ourselves under the care and direction of Capt. William Twitty, an active and enterprising woodsman, of good original mind and great benevolence, and although a light habited man, in strength and agility of bodily powers was not surpassed by any of his day and time, well calculated for the enterprise."

On March 25, 1775, Indians attacked their encampment near the head of the Taylor's Fork of Silver Creek, striking while the expedition slept. Captain Twitty was severely wounded through both knees. His slave, Sam, was shot fatally, but not before jumping to his feet, apparently reflexively, and then fell dead into the fire. Indians rushed forward to scalp Captain Twitty, but his bull dog leapt at the throat of one of them and brought him down. Another Indian tomahawked the brave dog who gave his life for his master and the Indians then fled back into the forest.

Captain Twitty's wounds proved mortal and the survivors of the expedition then built a few rude cabins for the wounded to recover in near the site where he was buried. The "fort," which lacked even a stockade, was the first fort erected in the Kentucky territory, and was named in Twitty's honor. There is a roadside historical marker near the site of Fort Twitty today. The expedition went on to found Boonesboro and other settlements and it marked the opening of the Kentucky country to settlement.

The exact ancestry of Captain Twitty is unknown, but it is highly likely that he is descended from Thomas Twitty who emigrated to Virginia from England in the middle of the 17th century. The exact descent is, perhaps, unrecoverable at this point.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Twitty
Title: Joel Gregory Lewis (finalized by Geraldine C. Twitty), The Twitty Famil
y in America 1671-1976 (Walters Prining Company: 1976)
y in America 1671-1976
y in America 1671-1976. Walters Prining Company: 1976.
Given Name: William
Death: 25 MAR 1775 Twitty's Fort, Kentucky
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Bellars, Susan (b. )
Note: Nothing is known of the ancestry of Ssuan Bellars Twitty. She subsequently married General William Graham
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Twitty
Title: Joel Gregory Lewis (finalized by Geraldine C. Twitty), The Twitty Famil
y in America 1671-1976 (Walters Prining Company: 1976)
y in America 1671-1976
y in America 1671-1976. Walters Prining Company: 1976.
Given Name: Susan
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Stoll, Catherine (b. )
Given Name: Catherine
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Stoll, Justinius (b. )
Given Name: Justinius
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Copyright 2003 John Steele Gordon