Genealogy Data Page 15 (Notes Pages)


Burrows, Frances Harriet (b. 14 JUN 1798, d. 28 APR 1836)

Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: CD
Title: William C. Marye, Colonial Dames ancestor chart, prepared for Margaret M
. Steele, Jan. 3, 1916
. Steele, Jan. 3, 1916
. Steele, Jan. 3, 1916.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Eisenberg
Title: Gerson G. Eisenberg, Marylanders Who Served the Nation: A BIographical D
ictionary of (Annapolis, Maryland: Maryland State Archives, 1992)
ictionary of
ictionary of. Annapolis, Maryland: Maryland State Archives, 1992.
Given Name: Frances Harriet
Death: 28 APR 1836
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Burrows, William Ward (b. 16 JAN 1758, d. 5 APR 1805)
Note: The only surviving son of a very prominent and successful lawyer and merchant, William Ward Burrows received a first-class education and was admitted to the Inner Temple at the Inns of Court, London, on May 25 1772.

He served as an officer in the South Carolina Marines during the Revolution and when the United States Marine Corps was established by law, on Jul 11 1798, President John Adams appointed him as its first commandant with the rank of major. He was soon promoted to lieutenant colonel, the rank of the commandant of the Corps for the next several decades.

The authorized strength of the Corps initially was one major, four captains, twenty-eight lieutenants, and 848 enlisted men. In 1800 the capital moved to Washington, D.C., from Philadelphia and when Thomas Jefferson, a friend of Burrows, became President, the two rode out together on horseback looking for a suitable site to establish the Marine Corps barracks and commandant's quarters and chose one near the site of what would be the Washington Navy Yard. The Marine Barracks is now the oldest continuously ultilized military post in the United States with the exception of West Point (see No. 476). While the original barracks have long been replaced, the Commandant's house built by Burrows remains the official residence of the Commandant of the Marine Corps today, although much altered from its original appearence. It was the only official building that was not torched by the British when they attacked Washington in the War of 1812. A portrait of William Ward Burrows, painted long after his death, hangs in the front hall.

Col. Burrows also instituted the Marine Corps Band. Lacking money for it from Congress, which had only authorized a fife and drum corps, Burrows wrote every officer in the Corps and suggested that they contribute a percentage of their pay towards the purchase of instruments. His reprimand of one officer who was either reluctant or delinquent in this forced contribution is in Marine Corps files. Much of his correspondence while Marine Corps Commandant is in the National Archives and is a fascinating window into the world in which he lived.

On New Year's Day, 1801, the first day the 19th century, Burrows marched his band to the White House and staged a concert for President John Adams, who was delighted. The band did the same for President Thomas Jefferson on July 4th that year, having also performed at his inauguration. Marine Corps Band White House concerts became a regular event in the new capital, and the Marine Corps Band, known as "The President's own," has to this day a central and official place in White House ceremonies and entertaining.

Failing health brought about Col. Burrows's retirement from the Corps on Nov 7 1804. He died early the following year. "The most benevolent of men, " according to an obituary in the Charleston City Gazette of Mar 28 1805, "he had devoted himself to the benefit of his fellow creatures; but that malignant friend Ingratitude was ever his reward. After struggling with severe illness he resigned existence with the celestial calmness of a good man." Why the newspaper should say that ingratitude was the reward of his service, which would appear to have been singularly successful, is unknown. An article in Poulson's American Daily Advertiser in 1805 said that "his services in nursing the infant corps over which he presided, so useful to our naval enterprizes, ought to be particularly commended by a grateful country."
In Salmagundi, Washington Irving described William Ward Burrows as "a gentleman of accomplished mind and polished manners."

He was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery in Washington, D.C., and was reinterred, with full honors, in Arlington National Cemetery across the Potomac in 1892, when Arlington was established.

In 1940 a Grace Line ship, taken into the United States Navy as a troop transport, was renamed the U.S.S. <i>William Ward Burrows </i>in his honor.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: SCHGM
Title: South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine
Data:
Text: "The William Burrows House of Charleston" by Harriett P and Alberts Simons, Vol. 70 (1969), pp. 155-176.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: SCHGM
Title: South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine
Page: Vol. 70 (1969), p. 239.
Given Name: William Ward
Death: 5 APR 1805 Washington, D.C.
Change: Date: 5 Apr 2003

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Bond, Mary (b. 1766, d. FEB 1803)
Given Name: Mary
Death: FEB 1803 Washington, D.C.
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Pegram, Edward (b. 20 JAN 1772, d. 5 NOV 1814)
Note: He was known as "Fighting Ned" because of his service in the War of 1812. He was a large landowner and slaveholder in Dinwiddie County.
Given Name: Edward
Death: 5 NOV 1814
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Pegram, Anne Lyle (b. 6 AUG 1771, d. 26 JAN 1825)
Given Name: Anne Lyle
Death: 26 JAN 1825
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Raincock, George C. (b. BEF 1779, d. MAR 1850 OR MAY 1850)
Given Name: George C.
Death: MAR 1850 OR MAY 1850 Norfolk, Virginia
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Lewis, Rebecca Parham (b. 8 APR 1792)
Baptism: JUN 1792 Bristol Parish, Prince George County, Virginia
Given Name: Rebecca Parham
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Alricks, Harmanus (b. 16 FEB 1764, d. 28 AUG 1840)
Note: Harmanus Alricks moved to Baltimore, Maryland, about 1790 and was a successful merchant there.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: NYGBR
Title: New York Genealogical and Biographical Record
Data:
Text: "Peter Alricks, of the Amsterdam Colony" by George Hannah, July, 1893, pp. 125-132.
Given Name: Harmanus
Death: 28 AUG 1840 Baltimore, Maryland
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Parks, Jane (b. 1772, d. 29 MAY 1844)
Note: Jane Parks's brother, Andrew, married Harriet Washington, the niece of President George Washington, daughter of his bankrupt brother, Samuel. In Washington's correspondence is to be found numerous letters between him and his sister, Mrs. Lewis, regarding Harriet, her brothers, and her marriage to Andrew Parks.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: NYGBR
Title: New York Genealogical and Biographical Record
Data:
Text: "Peter Alricks, of the Amsterdam Colony" by George Hannah, July, 1893, pp. 125-132.
Given Name: Jane
Death: 29 MAY 1844
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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McElderry, Horatio Clagett (b. 17 APR 1792, d. 3 SEP 1821)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Bowie
Title: Effie Gywnn Bowie, Across the years in St. George's County
Given Name: Horatio Clagett
Death: 3 SEP 1821
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Forbes, Eliza (b. 3 APR 1797, d. 3 OCT 1825)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Marye
Title: William B. Marye, Chart prepared for Margaret Steele for her applicatio
n to the Colonial Dames
n to the Colonial Dames
n to the Colonial Dames.
Given Name: Eliza
Death: 3 OCT 1825
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Maynadier, Daniel (b. 26 AUG 1724, d. 30 DEC 1772)
Note: The Rev. Daniel Maynadier was the rector of Great Choptank Parish in Dorchester County.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: Daniel
Death: 30 DEC 1772
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Murray, Mary (b. 1729)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: Mary
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Nelson, Arthur (b. ABT 1721, d. BEF 24 JAN 1792)
Note: Arthur Nelson was a planter and landowner, holding in Frederick County alone some 794 acres in 1773. He was active in many businesses in the Point of Rocks area. In the census of 1790 his household is described as consisting of himself, one male under age 16, two females, and fourteen slaves.

Although too old to serve in a military capacity in the Revolution, he was among those appointed to receive donations for the cause and in 1782 was reimbursed for expenses to the amount of ten pounds ten shillings.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Western Maryland Genealogy
Title: Western Maryland Genealogy
Page: Vol. 8, Nos. 1, 2
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Western Maryland Genealogy
Title: Western Maryland Genealogy
Page: Vol. 8 (1992), No. 1, pp. 3-9, No. 2, pp. 50-55
Given Name: Arthur
Death: BEF 24 JAN 1792
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Sim, Joseph (b. 1725, d. 27 NOV 1793)
Note: Joseph Sim lived at "Sim's Delight" in Prince George's County until at least Jul 1779, and at "Addison's Choice" in Frederick County beginning before Nov 1781. He also engaged in mercantile pursuits, and owned a storehouse in Upper Marlborough about 1765. He was in partnership with his nephew Patrick Sim Smith in the firm of Sim and Smith in Frederick, Maryland, by the early 1780's and that firm was in financial difficulties by the 1790's, requiring Sim to sell off much land to pay his debts.

He served in the lower house of the legislature, representing Prince George's County, in 1771, 1773-74. he served in the Senate in 1776-81. He was a member of the executive council in 1777, elected to fill a vacancy, and was reelected in Nov of that year, but declined to serve. He was a clerk in the Prince George's County Court from 1749 until 1767. He was a major in the Prince George's County Militia by 1751 and was appointed colonel on May 5 1774. he was colonel of the 11th battalion of Prince George's County Militia in 1776-77, resigning on Sep 23 1777. In 1780 he contributed 500 pounds current money and four hogsheads of tobacco to support the Continental Army.

In Oct 1793, Sim agreed to resurvey and sell his Frederick County plantation, consisting of about 1511 acres, in exchange for the purchaser satisfying all outstanding liens and judgments against it. He died the following month, leaving a personal estate of 1234.14.9 current money, including twenty-nine slaves. he also still held about 150 acres in Prince George's County.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: Joseph
Death: 27 NOV 1793
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Murdock, Katharine (b. , d. 29 NOV 1771)
Given Name: Katharine
Death: 29 NOV 1771
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Burrows, William (b. 19 DEC 1725, d. BEF 2 MAY 1781)
Note: William Burrows was born in London and emigrated to Charleston while still a boy according to family tradition, arriving in 1741. His ancestry is currently unknown beyond his parents, but he mentions in his will a Fawkes family Bible that he left to his daughter Mary. That, perhaps, is a clue to be explored further.

He prospered greatly in Charleston, which was just coming into its colonial glory days when Burrows arrived. He was admitted to the bar in 1748 and became a justice of the peace in Berkeley County (which includes Charleston) in 1756. He became Master of Chancery in 1761, assistant justice the following year, and a judge in 1764. In addition to his legal practice, he was active in the mercantile community, and owned much land outside the city, amounting to over 10,000 acres by 1775.

He served as president of both the St. George's Society and the South Carolina Society. In 1748 he was one of the men subscribing to a fund for the Charleston Library Society.

By 1772 he was one of Charleston's leading citizens and began construction on his house on Broad Street, almost next to St. Michael's Church, where he had purchased pew number 8 in 1759. The house had six bedrooms, dining room, and library as well as an elegant drawing room. Much of the furniture was supplied by Thomas Elfe (No. 182).

On Burrows death, the house was left to his son, who sold it to Thomas Hall. On the latter's death it was sold to Jehu Jones, a "free man of color" for $13,000. Jones ran it as a popular and fashionable hotel. Samuel F. B. Morse used to stay and paint portraits there and Fanny Kemble mentions it (not altogether flatteringly) in her diary. Over the years it declined from hotel into rooming house and finally was untenanted in its last two years. Declared unsafe it was dismantled in 1928 to be reerected elsewhere. When that did not happen, its drawing room was saved and installed at the Winterthur Museum in Delaware.

Burrows left his two surviving children well provided for, his property included twenty-one slaves, including two trained carpenters and a shoemaker. In his will he set free "in recompence of the many services rendered me" his "faithful Nego Slave named Marcus" and asked that his son pay Marcus five pounds sterling every December 30th for life.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: SCHGM
Title: South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine
Data:
Text: "The William Burrows House of Charleston" by Harriett P and Alberts Simons, Vol. 70 (1969), pp. 155-176.
Given Name: William
Death: BEF 2 MAY 1781 Charleston, South Carolina
Change: Date: 5 Apr 2003

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Ward, Mary (b. 11 OCT 1728, d. APR 1775)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: SCHGM
Title: South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine
Data:
Text: "The William Burrows House of Charleston" by Harriett P and Alberts Simons, Vol. 70 (1969), pp. 155-176.
Given Name: Mary
Death: APR 1775 Charleston, South Carolina
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Bond, Thomas (b. 10 AUG 1743, d. 17 JUL 1793)
Note: Thomas Bond, Junior, matriculated at the Academy of Philadelphia (the forerunner of the University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 when it opened and began attending the college there in 1757, graduating in 1760. He then studied medicine under his father.

But Bond also entered into trade at this time, operating a stocking company. In 1765 he managed a stocking factory that had been built to relieve the American dependence on British manufactured goods. "He carries on the stocking manufactory in all its branches," he advertised in 1772, "and will be pleased to encourage family industry and frugality, by working up their thread in the best manner." But the business did not flourish and he went heavily into debt to support it, to the amount of five or six thousand pounds according to John Adams, who may or may not have known what he was talking about. His father left a thousand pounds in his will when he died in 1784 to pay some of the debts.

Bond returned to the practice of medicine, but his heart seems not to have been fully in it. He was apparently a pleasant man and was made a member of the Fishing Company in 1763 and the Philosophical Society in 1764. In 1775, after his first wife's early death, John Adams, in the city for the Continental Congress, wrote his wife that Bond was "fat and jolly, a Lover of Pleasure." He also told his wife that Bond loved both wine and women and kept a mistress. "Epicurism and Debauchery, " sniffed Adams, "are more common in this Place than in Boston."

Bond joined the Pennsylvania militia as a surgeon in 1776 and was on the retreat from New Jersey in the dark days for the American cause of the fall of that year. He worked hard to care for the sick, although he often lacked even basic medical supplies. He urged that hospitals be established near rivers, so that the wounded might be brought to them by water rather than the terrible roads. He was appointed an assistant director of the General Hospital (the Continental Army's medical corps) in 1777 and was named purveyor-general in 1780. As purveyor to the medical corps he became an original member of the Society of the Cincinnati when it was established in 1783.

After the Revolution, Bond practiced medicine with his father, and after the latter's death, with Goodwin Wilson, who had been a pupil of his father. Again widowed, he married a third time in 1786. Dr. Shippen, another distinguished Philadelphia physician, thought this might steady him, as, according to Shippen, he was "going to destruction very fast" at this time.

At this time Bond acquired the rights to vast lands in western Virginia, perhaps as much as 80,000 acres, and it was while he was touring these lands that he took ill and died. Buried in Morgantown, in what is now West Virginia, he was moved to Christ Church cemetery, Philadelphia, in 1901, not far from the grave of his father.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: APS
Title: Whitfield J. Bell, Jr., Patriot-Improvers: Biographical Sketches of Mem
bers of the American Philospohical Society (Philadelphia, Pa.: American P
hilosophical Society, 1997)
bers of the American Philospohical Society
ers of the American Philospohical Society. Philadelphia, Pa.: American P
hilosophical Society, 1997.
Page: Vol. II, in manuscript, courtesy of the author
Given Name: Thomas
Death: 17 JUL 1793 Morgantown, West Virginia
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Morgan, Ann (b. ABT 1745, d. 6 APR 1774)
Note: The tombstone of Ann Morgan, in Christ Church Cemetery, Philadelphia, reads:

Mrs. Ann Bond
The late amiable Consort of
Thomas Bond Junr
and Daughter of the worthy and much lamented
Evan Morgan Esq.
She departed this life
the 6th of April 1774
Aged 29 years
The Body of her only Son
Thomas Bond
was also here deposited, who
died a month before her at 3 years old

Round them, ye Angels, constant vigils keep:
And guard, fair Innocence, their sacred sleep
Till that bright Morn shall make their beauteous clay
To bloom and sparkle in eternal Day.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: APS
Title: Whitfield J. Bell, Jr., Patriot-Improvers: Biographical Sketches of Mem
bers of the American Philospohical Society (Philadelphia, Pa.: American P
hilosophical Society, 1997)
bers of the American Philospohical Society
ers of the American Philospohical Society. Philadelphia, Pa.: American P
hilosophical Society, 1997.
Page: Vol. II, in manuscript, courtesy of the author
Given Name: Ann
Death: 6 APR 1774 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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